A Bermuda Beach Day (II)

The beauty of Bermuda blows me away!  With blush pink sands, turquoise water and remarkable coves, there are nothing quite like the beaches in Bermuda!

We spent our second day in Bermuda at the beach.  We chose the Horseshoe Bay beach since it is one of the most applauded beaches in Bermuda.

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Most of the cruise people went there, consequently it was much more crowded than other beaches.

Facing the water to the right side of the beach is the Horseshoe Bay Cove.  There rocky terrain rising above the bay encircles the clear water to shape the cove,  it’s like a solitude within a retreat.

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When we arrived in the early morning, we were the only ones at the cove.

So to avoid the crowd, go there early and venture out.

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We also walked to the left side of the Bay.  It was even better!  So seclusive, some part of the beach felt like a private one because we were the only ones there!

One thing for sure, the further away from the Horseshoe Bay, the more striking the scenery, the rockier the beach.

If you want to venture out the beach area as I did, just remember to wear steady footwear.  The rocks were VERY sharp!  Arthur’s Chaco were perfect.  At one point I left my flip flops with my mother-in-law, and I ended up hurting my feet trying to climb across some rocks.

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The sands are definitely pink, much pinker near the area where waves smash the shore.

Of course, locals may not go to the Horseshoe Bay beach, it may be too touristy for them.

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On the bus tour of the first day, we passed by many pink sand beaches and coves.  Some coves were so small and cozy, just perfect as a romantic getaway.

The weather in Bermuda is mild with the highest in the 80s in the summer and the lowest in the 50s in the winter.  However with the humidity in the summer 80s can feel like in the 90s; with the gusty wind in the winter, the 50s like in the 40s.  While we were there in the early June, the daily temperatures were consistent in the range of 75–77 F.  Yes, it was not a typo, the high and low of a day were virtually the same!

There are various public transportation (buses and ferries) available leaving from the Royal Naval Dockyard to the City of Hamilton, the Town of St. George and different beaches.  Our taxi costed $32 from the cruise dock to the Horseshoe Bay one way, so it is a great value if you go with a group.

Before this trip, my knowledge of Bermuda was minimal; it was a mysterious place where boats disappeared for no reason. In reality Bermuda only takes up less than 4% of the Bermuda Triangle.  We are safe.  The thing might have killed us is not the vanish of our ship rather the high price tag of living there.  The island is VERY expensive, about two times more than what we pay in mainland US.  A gallon of gasoline costs $8! A gallon of milk $14! A mid-range meal for a couple $130!! Although it is understandable that virtually everything on the island has to be shipped here from the mainland. But still, ouch!!

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There are direct flights from major cities to Bermuda, so this little paradise can be an easy weekend getaway.  Oh, one more thing, don’t forget to pack a pair of Bermuda shorts to Bermuda!!

First time to dip my toes in pink sands! 😍🏖 #content #happyday

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A Cruise Getaway to Bermuda (I)

Recently we accompanied my mother-in-law to Bermuda boarding Royal Caribbean Cruise.  After only two days we fell in love with the island and convinced that we would be back.  And next time bring our children with us.

Our cruise ship left from the port Baltimore, we picked this cruise for the convenient location, this way my mother-in-law could skip the stress of flying on the plane.

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Bermuda is an independently governed British territory in North Atlantic Ocean.  Our cruise ship docked at the Royal Naval Dockyard at King’s Wharf.

There are museums and restaurants in the Naval Dockyard, and a craft market, a clock tower mall, swimming with dolphins, a snorkel park, even a fun golf site, you can easily spend a half day exploring the dockyard.  The one site on the top of the list should be the National Museum of Bermuda.

On our first day on the island we took a mini-bus tour. The bus picked us up from the Royal Naval Dockyard; it took about five-hour to tour the whole island.

The beautiful coast took our breaths away.  Right there we decided that our second day in Bermuda would be a beach day! (see part II for more)

This newly refurbished Gibbs Hill Lighthouse is one of Bermuda’s iconic attractions. There were 185 steps to the top! Just to give you a perspective–the Bunker Hill in Boston is 294 steps. ( I passed out while climbing the Monument, it was in the heat of summer and I was that close to the top. You won’t forget it easily after a humiliating experience like that🤣.)

DSC04931This is the island view at the base of the Lighthouse, just imaging the view from the top! However we were only given 20 minutes, not enough time to climb.  But one couple decided to climb it regardless for the Lighthouse was such an iconic destination!  You guessed right… the whole bus had to wait for them…

Every corner we turned was a photogenic view.  Golf courses there were world class.

The capital of Bermuda is City of Hamilton, lots of people go here for duty free shopping.  If you just want a few souvenirs to take home, our tour guide recommended this store–on the left hand side of the Burnaby Street as soon as we made a right turn from the Front Street, the cheapest T-shirt there was about $8 (on the cruise $10 on sale with fewer selections).

There are lots of churches on the island.  If you throw a rock randomly, you may hit the stained glass of a church! (Legend says so😉)

Here are a few of my favorites.  Heydon’s Chapel is the oldest church in Bermuda, and the smallest and most endearing.  The church was built in 1620.  ‘Sing to God,  Sing praises to His name; Lift up a song to Him who rides upon the clouds; His name is the Lord, exult before Him. Psalm 68:4.’

The Unfinished Church was planned as a replacement for St. Peter’s Church.  The construction started in mid-19th century, but left unfinished when running out of fund.  I wish we had more time to linger there, it would be a beautiful spot for wedding.

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And St. Peter’s Church in the Town of St.  George.  This is the oldest continuously used Anglican church in the western hemisphere, more than 400 years old!

St. George is at the eastern tip of Bermuda.  The town and the surrounding fortifications as a whole is a UNESCO World Heritage site.  Lots of the sites were closed since our bus arrived after 5 pm.  St. George will be our #1 choice of lodging locations if we go back to Bermuda.

Things we might do differently:

Bermuda consists of more 180 islands, totally 20 square miles.  The Bermuda we refer to is the largest island.  You can get away from participating the cruise excursion especially you have friends and family travel together, just do your own tour.  Normally we prefer the freedom of doing our own things than taking tours since we always feel rushed with a tour.  However with a 89-year-old mom with us, bus tour was the next best thing.

At the Royal Naval Dockyard, right outside of our cruise, there were MANY taxis waiting for service.  You could pay the driver by hour, this way you have your personal driver and tour guide for your group.  Our excursion was $100/person, for the four of us we could have hired a driver for the day with a much greater amount of freedom, like climbing the Lighthouse and lingering longer at the Unfinished Church!

Happy first day of summer!! #sailing

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Puerto Vallarta Winter Getaway

It is very easy to fall in love with Puerto Vallarta (PV).  Warm weather, clear beach, great food and show, and extremely friendly people.  Here are the things we loved and things we could have skipped in PV.

Marietas Islands Hidden Beach tour is the #1 on my list, an absolute must-do! These groups of isles are more than an hour ride from PV, they are beautiful with rugged rocky shore.  Boats can’t dock there, you have to swim to get on the islands.  The tour company provides life jackets and gaggle gears for the swim.  The water is so blue and the islands very beautiful.

There is a hidden beach, you can’t see the beach from outside sea, have to swim over the low overhand to get on the beach, so check the tide table for low tides.  Only 80 people per day are allowed to get on the island, six people to get on the beach in any given time. Make sure to book early.

On the way to the islands we saw whales and many dolphins.

We also highly recommend the Rhythms of the Night Dinner Show! The show is on Las Caletas, an hour boat ride to the south of PV, a place of sporty recreation during the day and romantic candle-light dinner and entertainment at night.  There is no electricity there, four thousands lit candles were waiting for us when we reached the shore!

The food was great and the show was full of amazing acrobatic moments.  Each evening there are two dinners and one show in between, so make sure to specify which dinner you want for the evening when booking.  I wish I knew more about Mexican culture and language to understand the show.  What a wonderful way to spend the night.

Puerto Vallarta is a very artsy tourist town.  There are many wonderful art displays over every corner of the city especially the one-mile long El Malecon Boardwalk along downtown water front.  Every Tuesday morning there is a guided art sculpture tour, it costs $15. Although you can easily do a self-guided tour, just walk along the boardwalk you won’t miss anything.  The dance of the Flyers, Danza de los Voladores, is a preserved ancient Mesoamerican ritual.

If you have children, the Turtle Camp is a wonderful and fun educational activity with the whole family.  You learn about the life of turtles, at the end you can hold a baby turtle and release it back to the ocean.

The Puerto Vallarta City tour is suitable for someone who wants to see the whole city in one day.  It is too crammed in my opinion.  The bus picked us up from our hotel and everybody else, it was a bus-ful of tourists.  We stopped at many attractions briefly including Malecon boardwalk, the church of Our Lady Guadeloupe etc.

We had lunch at a family-owned restaurant near Mismaloya, very unique setting in the wood.  Afterward we walked to a nearby tequila distillery for tasting.  They even blocked big chunk of time for us shopping for souvenirs, twice!  It was a whole day tour.

We stayed at Marriott.  Everywhere we travel, I like to book Marriott for lodging, just love the bedding and pillows and their affordable price. This resort offers many water activities and have a couple of restaurants and nice pools.

I like the location, walking distance to food and market.  There is a public bus stop outside of the resort, the bus fare to downtown is only 7.5 pesos. (The exchange rate $1=19 pesos!)  Our bus ride was fun, we met many snowbirds from America and Canada on the bus.

And taxi is very convenient and reliable, about 80 pesos from hotel to downtown.

When we were in Mexico City two year ago we fell in love with the real Mexican food.  So this time in Puerto Vallarta we were searching for authentic seafood at the places where the locals went.  We tried a handful of the local favorites, and liked most of them, especially fresh seafood, even the food from street vendors and night market were excellent.

The Cafe des Artistes is on the top list of my recommendation. It is at the high end, about $50 per person.  Really romantic, perfect for anniversary or any special occasion.  The restaurant is beautifully decorated, the exquisitely prepared food is accompanied with romantically serenaded music.  They have the best pumpkin soup, the fish dish is so flavorful, and the dessert is to die for.

Another restaurant on my recommendation list is La Langosta Feliz (The Happy Lobster), a seafood restaurant.  If you don’t order the gigantic seafood platter (shown on the picture above), we didn’t, the price was very cheap–four of us spent about 1,500 pesos, less than $80!

We had quite adventure there, I had to share this story!

As I mentioned before, our love of food always push us to search for authentic local food.  One taxi driver highly recommended the Happy Lobster, so we decided to give it a try.  We left from Malecon boardwalk thinking it would be a pleasant walk, it turned out way too far to get there on foot.  As we were asking a local woman how much further we needed to go, we were approached by an elderly man who warmly volunteered to take us there.  Not only that, he also acclaimed to be the owner of that restaurant and offered us 20% discount!  Apparently he owned a couple of restaurants in Puerto Vallarta, the Happy Lobster we were going was currently managed by one of his sons! “Just wait here!” he said, “Let me go and get my car, I take you because I am going there anyway.”

What do you think?  If in your shoes, would you wait and go with him, in a city where you were a stranger?!

As soon as he left, we waved down a taxi.  We couldn’t get out there fast enough! It turned out we were only half mile away.

The restaurant was awesome! Seafood was great, fresh and tasty. Lots of locals and tourists like us were there.  The waiters spoke good English. The service was prompt and warm, the food portion was decent. I had octopus ceviche and freshly caught snapper (see the pictures above), loved both.  If I had to pick on something, the music was a bit too loud to our taste, especially the band came to the table side and played.

By the time we ordered and chewed on our appetizer, lo and be hold, that elderly man walked in and straightly approached our table, padded my husband’s shoulder “haha you made it.” !!!

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The manager (on the right) was indeed his son!!

We are so accustomed to not trust strangers; we teach our children that and we model those teachings ourselves.   We may be safer but how we miss otherwise great opportunity to make friends!   People are much more genuine and loving than we portray them! Especially in Puerto Vallarta!

So if you visit Puerto Vallarta, please go and eat at the Happy Lobster.  If you see him, ask for a discount, I guarantee you will get it.  (I didn’t get the discount he promised since I didn’t even want him to remember our prior conversation.)    His heart is made of gold.

 

Israel Impressions Part IV: Jerusalem, the Center of the World

We spent four days in Jerusalem, and it didn’t seem enough.  The city had so much to offer, there were so many sites to see in this mere 220 acres’ space.  To simplify things, I am focusing on three major sites: the Temple Mount, Church of the Holy Sepulchre, and the Mount of Olives.

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While preparing the trip to Israel, I came across an article about Jerusalem being the center of the world, geographically.   I am not sure about that, but feel free to form your own opinion.  Judging from how long it took me to fly to Tel Aviv, America was definitely very far from the center. 🙂

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At least spiritually Jerusalem is the center of the three biggest religions of the world.

Temple Mount is the third most holy site for the Muslims, after Mecca and Medina (the Mosque of the Prophet), with Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa Mosque.  According to Muslim believe, Mohammad was taken up to heaven and received revelation of truth at this location.

For the Jewish worshipers, Mt. Moriah where the Temple Mount is now is also their holiest site too. It was there Abraham attempted to sacrifice Issac, Solomon built the first temple, Zerubbabel the second one after returning from the captivity.  The second temple was grandly enlarged by Herod the Great 500 years later, it was the temple Jesus stayed behind when he was 12 years old.  Today the only remain of the Herod’s temple is the Western Wall, aka the Wailing wall, here Jewish worshipers lament for the loss and pray for the renew and rebuild of the holy temple one day.

For the Christians, the most holy section in Jerusalem is the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.  The church was built on Golgotha where Jesus was crucified and buried, and three days later resurrected.  It has the last five stops of the Via Dolorosa, the Way of Suffering,  pilgrims from all over the world come to touch the ground, to meditate how much Christ suffered and paid for the penalty for the sins of the world, aka yours and mine.

Mount of Olives is the hill east of Jerusalem across the Kidron Valley. It used to be the burial ground of Jerusalem.  It became a very meaningful place for the Christians because Jesus was taken up to heaven from Mount of Olives, and he will be back the same way he left according to the writing of the Bible.  So you can imagine the numbers of the grandiose churches built on top of Mount of Olives.

A great view of the city of Jerusalem from Mount of Olives.

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Thank you so much for going through this series of impressions.  I hope my journey to Holy Land help you with your future travel planning and your growth in faith.

Israel Impressions Part III: Dead Sea and Beyond

The Dead Sea has the world saltest body of water, with 34% salinity! It is 430 meters below sea level, which makes it the lowest elevation on Earth.  And today the water level is still reducing in an alarming rate, by three feet each year.  Dry land can be spotted especially at the southern portion of the sea.

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The fact that this extraordinary water may some day be gone is hard for anyone to stomach.  What can we DO?  We can’t just sit there blame on the climate change and global warming, right?

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Have you seen a picture of someone floating in the Dead Sea?  I used to roll my eyes, couldn’t imagine floating in the Sea until my own trip to the Dead Sea, yes, you could float, effortlessly!!  However it was recommended you keep the float time within 15 minutes and take a fresh water shower immediately after.

Driving along the west shore of the Dead Sea, we saw canals being dug, palm trees planted, and hotels built.  The people living in this salty land have definitely earned my respect and praise.  They are making history and changing the soil one section at a time.

Mount Sodom is a hill on the southwestern shore of the Dead Sea. The whole mountain is made of salty rocks.  Lucky us, we found a huge chunk of salt rock with beautiful layers.

“You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. Matthew 5:13”.

Jericho, the oldest city in the world, is located at the northern border of the Dead Sea.  There we visited the ruin of Jericho, and from there overlooked the Mount Temptation where Jesus was tested in the wilderness (Matthew 4: 1-11). Can you see the Israelites matching in silence around the tall city walls daily? Can you hear their loud shouts at the seventh day which bring down the walls?

The story of Masada was about an epic battle.  In 70-73 CE, Jewish rebels took over the fortress (used to be Herod’s extravagant palace in the desert) against Roman siege.  The ending was a heartbrokenly sad one.  All 960 men and women chose massive suicide to keep their dignity, refused to be slaves of their enemies.  Today it is a tradition for young soldiers to come to Masada to swear in when they graduate from the academy.

At Qumran near the Dead Sea, the first ancient scrolls (manuscripts dated back two thousand years!) were discovered in a cave by a shepherd boy in 1947.  In the following years, more books in more caves were discovered one after another.  Up to now, pieces from every book of the Bible with the exception of Book of Esther were discovered, including a complete Book of Isaiah.  The cave #4 was the easiest one to access and provided the most scrolls.

If you just visit the Southern District of Israel, you may think the country is made of desert land! That is not true. Although the nation of Israel is tiny, only 8500 square miles,  the land is very diverse.

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When we were in the Northern District, Tel Dan Nature Reserve–the origin of the Jordan River, we walked along spring water and green forest.  And don’t forget the fresh water lake–the Sea of Galilee.

This trip has also left me everlasting impressions of the people in Israel.  Smart, tough, driven, they seem able to survive anywhere in any given situation.

Kibbutz is like the realization of communist ideal on Earth.  And currently they have more than 270 this type of communities in Israel.  In the Kibbutz we visited we were so impressed with their irrigating system–each banana tree was monitored electronically, watered and nourished according to its individual need! What about that!!

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A fruit stand by the street in Jerusalem.  Can you see the huge bananas and pomegranates the size of baby’s head?  Today Israel is the second largest high tech nation, second to US, and a fruit–exporting country.  The land has slowly and surely come again to her original state, flowing with milk and honey.  Salute!

One more thing before I let you go.  Young men and women serve in the army after high school for three and two years, respectively.  Only after the service they go to college with free tuition, of course.  They carry their weapon, OPENLY.  No comment…

Israel Impressions Part II: All About Jesus

One of the main purposes of our Holy Land trip was to follow the footsteps of Lord Jesus.  We visited Bethlehem, Jesus’s birth place, Nazareth, where he grew up, Capernaum, his hometown for 3 1/2 year ministry on Earth, and of course Jerusalem, Via Dolorosa and Golgotha where he was crucified and resurrected.  It was beyond amazing to visit those historical sites, where holy scriptures were brought to life.

The “little town” Bethlehem is six miles south of Jerusalem in Palestine. Thanks for the pilgrims and tourism, today it is a bustling city with 28,000 people.  From where we had lunch in Bethlehem we could see Jerusalem.  Although the Israel and Palestine relationship was complicated, visitors could get in and out of Bethlehem fairly easily.  Our tour company took care of the visa for us, it took us in no time to pass the security checkpoint.

The Chapel of Shepherd’s field and the Shepherd’s Caves

and the Church of Milk Grotto.

Of course, people from all over the world came to Bethlehem for the Church of Nativity, the very location where baby Jesus was born.  The entrance to the church was very small, I had to bend over to enter.  This design was to remind the pilgrims to be humble just like their king borne in a lowly manger.

Nazareth, the childhood home of Jesus, is the largest city in the Northern District of Israel, today known as “the Arab capital of Israel” with population over 75,000.

This grand Church of Annunciation was built on the grotto (lower level) where archangel Gabriel announced to virgin Mary that she had found favor with God, she would conceive and give birth to a son and He would save the people from their sins.  In the upper level of church there were collective displays of “Mary and Child” donated from all over the world.  The one from America was quite contemporary😉.

Photo Oct 27, 10 29 38 PMContrary to the Church of Annunciation,  the Church of St. Joseph was in the same complex, but much simpler.  It was built on top of Joseph’s grotto.  Mary and Joseph must had lived really close, almost like neighbors. 😀

The Nazareth Village was the re-creation of  first century Nazareth, away from the city on an untouched farm land with shepherds and sheep, olive trees and oil press, and a replica of first century synagogue.

South of the city stood the Mount of Precipice, it silently witnessed that the prophet was not welcomed by his own community.  Luke 4  told us how the people of Nazareth rejected Jesus, they wanted to push him off the cliff.  Since then he moved his ministry to Capernaum.

One of the highlights of this trip was the boat tour at the Sea of Galilee.  It was a beautiful sunny day.  Can you picture Jesus walking on this water (Matthew 14:22-33) and calm the wind and waves (Mark 4:35-41)?

During the three years’ ministry on Earth, more than 80% of Jesus’ miracles were performed around the area of Capernaum/Galilee.  Wow!

The Church of St. Peter’s Primacy in Capernaum.  Jesus restored Peter after he denied Him three times before a rooster crowed.  “Do you love me? Feed my sheep.” also three times!

An other absolute highlight of the trip was being baptized in the Jordan River (Yardenit).  Not exactly on the same spot where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist, he was in today’s Jordan across from Tel Jericho, but the proximity was still exciting.  We re-dedicated ourselves in the Jordan River, although symbolic, it was an equally emotional event.

Thank you so much for reading this far! I really appreciate you following my journey!  Hopefully I will finish this impression series this weekend.map4

Israel Impressions Part I: Along the Mediterranean Sea

I had long desired to visit the Holy Land, my dream finally became a reality last month.  What a journey following the footsteps of Jesus! It was overwhelming.  I’m not sure where and how to begin, so the easy route is to arrange my Israel impressions according to the geographic order–along the Mediterranean Sea (east #1), near Galilee (north #2), the Dead Sea and Beyond (southwest #3), and Jerusalem (center #4).

Tel Aviv represents the present time of Israel, very modern just like any other major coastal city in the world.   From the ways people dress to the ways they interact, Tel Aviv is quite different from old city of Jerusalem, like day and night.  We stayed in Tel Aviv for two nights, the day we arrived and the day before we departed since Ben Gurion International Airport, the only international airport of Israel, is about 10 miles from Tel Aviv.

Jaffa, known as Yafo for the locals, Joppa in the Bible, is at the southern end of Tel Aviv, much more interesting in my opinion.  Jonah left his footprint in Jaffa (Jonah 1:3). So did apostle Peter (Acts 9:36-43).

St. Peter’s Church.  This was where Peter prayed and brought back Tabitha (her Greek name was Dorcas) from death, and not far from this church was tanner Simon’s house where Peter stayed when he was in Jaffa.

We had our first Israel breakfast in Jaffa at Nour28.  They served lots of fruits, vegetables, cheese and freshly baked bread.  It was very similar to the Mediterranean diet we’d known, I could easily get used to this cuisine.

Along the Mediterranean Sea, 35 miles north of Tel Aviv is Caeserea Maritima. Herod the Great built the city in ~22–10 BC and the name was chosen to honor Caesar Augustus.  It used to be the booming capital of Roman Province Judea in the time of Jesus.  Roman governor lived in the lavish palace by the sea, and here archaeologists discovered a stone tablet with Pontius Pilate’s name on it.

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Many biblical events happened at this location: St. Peter came here to share gospel with Cornelius, a God-fearing centurion after seeing visions (Acts 10).  Apostle Paul passed by Caesarea many times, he was imprisoned here at Herod’s Palace before being sent to Rome (Acts 23:23-35).

Do you know the whole nation of Israel is about the size of New Jersey?!  So don’t be surprised that many sites are close to each other.  Meggido is 30 miles east of Caesarea, a key crossroads to ancient trades and military battles along Mt. Carmel range. “Capturing Meggido is as good as capturing 1000 cities!”  This location is mentioned couple of times in the Bible, and each time is related to critical battles because of the strategic location.

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The story of prophetess Deborah defeated the Canaanites was recorded in Judge 5, Joshua defeated the king of Meggido in Joshua 12, and Josiah, the last good king of Judah,  was killed here in a battle with Pharaoh Necho of Egypt (2 Kings 23:29-30).  Probably the most famous record is from Revelation 16:16, the battle of  Armageddon, the name literally meant Mountains of Meggido.  Bible prophesies the final battle of good verse evil will happen at this very  location.

The excavation of the site revealed at least 20 cities from different eras built on top of each other!  Mindbogglingly amazing!! There was a very impressive tunnel built in King Ahab’s time (~1000 BC) to access water underground.

We also visited Muhraka Monastery on Mount Carmel where prophet Elijah prayed for rain and challenged 450 prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18).  From the monastery, we had a beautiful view of Jezreel Plain, across the valley in the far distance were Mt. Tabor (also called Mt. Transformation) and Nazareth.

The last city we toured along the Mediterranean Sea was Haifa.  According to cliché, “Jerusalem is the city of the pastTelAviv is the city of the present and Haifa is the city of the future.”  Today Haifa is the silicon valley of Israel, very beautiful and clean.  It seemed a very safe place to live, we saw a little kid walking his dog at night all by himself.

DSC09766(1)Our hotel in Haifa “Bayview” was next to the famous Baha’i Garden.  Great location with good breakfast buffet, clean and nice service, we highly recommend it.  Make sure to take a walk in the evening to the German Colony nearby.  There were restaurants and bars, and unique boutique shops, the Garden was amazing at night.

One thing worth mention, especially with the current hypes in the media about moving US Embassy to Jerusalem, is our hotel in Tel Aviv, Lusky.   The hotel is right across street from the America Embassy in Tel Aviv!  It is also on our recommended list, great location–across from the beach and very nice service.

A word about security check in Ben Gurion airport: it is mandatory to be at the airport THREE hours prior to flight departure.  So keep that in mind when you book flight ticket–if your flight leaves 7:30 am you HAVE TO be at the airport at 4:30 in the morning!!  No kidding.  Lusky arranged taxi for us, when we got out at 4 am, the driver was already there waiting for us!

Taxi was abundant and reliable in Tel Aviv.  It costed us 180 NIS (New Israel Shekel) to Tel Aviv city from the airport.  One US dollar was 3.7 NIS.  We had exchanged about 1,000 NIS before we left.  In reality it was not necessary.  We found out US dollar was accepted anywhere in Israel and hotels accepted major credit cards. Actually you should use credit card as often as possible because you don’t pay local tax (VAT 17%!) when using foreign credit card.

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