Iceland (VII): Mighty Waterfalls of the North

The must-see waterfalls in the north Iceland are Goðafoss and Dettifoss, part of the Diamond Circle.

There are at least two must-see waterfalls in the north Iceland: Goðafoss and Dettifoss, both waterfalls are part of the Diamond Circle.

Goðafoss is less than an hour east of Akureyri, the largest city in the north Iceland.

We approached the waterfall from the right bank, the foss was a short walk from the parking lot.

Oh, the sounds of the gushing water!! It felt dangerous climbing up the rugged rocks, but the fun did outweigh the fear.

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Walking away from the fall toward the bridge, we got an unobstructed view of the entire waterfall.  Can you see the bridal veil on the right?

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Great photo spot!godafoss7

The further away from the waterfall, the more panoramic the view.

We were not done yet, we crossed the bridge to the left bank

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and walked along the left bank to the viewing platform.

Before reaching the platform, we had an opportunity to walk down to see the waterfall down up.

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Goðafoss in Icelandic means “waterfall of gods”, the name was originated from the Icelandic conversion to Christianity in the year 1000.  Idols of Norse gods were thrown into this waterfall after the people accepted the Christian faith.

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What a sweeping sight from the viewing platform!  Here we could not only see the entire waterfall but the upstream river.  See the rocky spot at the right top corner where we stood half hour ago?

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Just as we pulled out the parking lot, the sky opened up to this gorgeous blue.  Too bad no time to go back, we had Myvatn next on our schedule.

The next mighty waterfall in the north is Dettifoss.  We visited Dettifoss the next morning.

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Dettifoss is in Vatnajökull National Park, the largest of the three national parks in Iceland.

The waterfall was viewed from the top.  With the water spray and fog,  I couldn’t tell how deep the canyon was.  An internet search reveals that Dettifoss is 330 feet wide and 144 feet deep!

No wonder this waterfall is regarded as the most powerful waterfall in Europe; and by sheer volume discharge, it is the largest waterfall in Iceland.

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Be careful to protect your camera from the waterfall’s spray! Especially if you stand at the viewing platform at this left bank as we did.

dettifoss9 To truly feel the power and energy of the waterfall, we walked down and got closer to the fall front.  Please stay on the path!

The water was grayish; this river upstream was Vatnajökull glacier.  I had a hard time believe it glacier water–before we met this mighty giant, glacier waterfall in Iceland was clear, pure and drinkable!

A fewer hundred meters away, there is another waterfall, Selfoss.

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The opposite bank offered a better panoramic view of the fall.

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FYI:

There are two roads from the Ring Road lead to Dettifoss: 862 on the west and 864 on the east of the fall.  Dettifoss can be viewed from both banks, however the roads don’t cross.  We chose to take 862 and viewed the waterfall from the west bank because the road was in better condition–862 is a paved road while 864 is a gravel road.

Iceland (V): From Borgarnes to Akureyri, Part I (North)

It was the fourth day, we continued to circle the Ring Road to the north.  It was about 200 miles from Borgarnes to Akureyri, we made multiple stops at Bifröst, Blönduós, Glaumbær, Hofsós, Siglufjörður, Dalvík and finally Akureyri.

Our first stop was Grabrok Crater at Bifröst, 30 minutes north of Borgarnes.

Grabrok was a volcanic crater.  Newly built paths circled the entire crater rim, with the panoramic view of the surrounding areas.

To the north, beautifully shaped mountains.

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To the west, a crater with similar shape and size.

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To the south, it was the small village Bifröst–beautiful but no rainbow bridge to Asgard.

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And the winding road we drove on a few minutes ago.

This site would be much nicer visit in a clear and calm day.  For a few instants, I was afraid to get blown into the crater pit by the wind! Other than that it was really fun to walk around the rim.

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Back to the road, there were many farm animals grazing under the big Icelandic sky–cows, horses, and lot of sheep.

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Do you know there are about 800,000 sheep and lambs in Iceland, a country with the population of just 323,000?!  To our surprise, most of the sheep we saw were small group of 3 to 5, not a large flock.

Our next town was Blönduós.  We saw kids jumping on a rainbow “trampoline”.

Here was our first encounter of black sand beach.  Cold and windy, we were the only souls on the beach! Haha yes, silly tourists.

Continuing north, we caught sight of a forest of young trees. There were the first seedlings we saw since arrival to this country.  Later on we learned from the museum guide that a great effort of replanting was on going in the country.  Most of the young trees were imported from oversea.  Can you imagine the island used to be covered by forests before human settled here?  It was understood that woods were cut down to use as fuels to combat cold.

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Another phenomenon we found out unique to Iceland: the center of any settlement, such as a village, a small town even just a couple of houses, was always a church.  Many churches were simple and in the same style: white body with red roof and a steeple.

Our next stop was Glaumbær in Skagafjörður. We went to visit a classic turf farm-museum.  You see, a church in the town center.

The farm museum was very interesting, the houses were covered with sods and grass.

There were at least 12 rooms connecting together, bedrooms for the farmer and his wife and their children, kitchen, storage rooms and many more.  The yellow brick building was a gift shop with a cozy cafe.

To be continued…

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